And so, another Childhood Cancer Awareness Month comes to a close. And I wonder if the general public is really any more aware. Did anyone learn anything new this month, anything that will change their actions or their giving patterns or their voting patterns? Did someone in a position of power see an image or read a story and decide to make a big change? Sometimes you wonder what it’s all for. We “like” some sad photos of sad bald children on Facebook and feel like activists. We share someone’s status update or read a heartbreaking blog written by a heartbroken parent and feel like we’ve made a difference.

We’re not really making a difference. Not enough anyway.

We walked on Saturday in the CureSearch Walk for Childhood Cancer. This was our fourth or fifth time walking and the crowd was smaller than ever. It was a gorgeous day, the route takes you through a gorgeous part of Cleveland (a very short, gorgeous part so that can’t be the excuse). There are free bagels and coffee and even post-walk lunch provided by Chik-Fil-A (trying to earn some brownie points with a non-controversial cause, perhaps?). By no one shows up. Like, really, almost no one. There were maybe 150 people registered. Couldn’t have been more than 200 there. 250 with kids and babies?

It’s weird. And sad. I know everyone has their causes and I certainly don’t go to every walk or race or stair-climb I’m invited to. And I’m not at all guilt-tripping my people for not going, I promise — not one tiny bit. I would have asked harder if I wanted you all there. St. Baldrick’s is our thing and that’s more than enough to satisfy us personally. But in terms of the bigger picture, the big, broad, general public picture and its “awareness” of childhood cancer? Well, it seems pretty non-existent.

And if the public is truly aware — aware of the truth that pediatric cancer kills more children than any other disease (and indeed more than the top five other disease killers combined), that one in every five children diagnosed won’t survive, that of those who do survive, more than 60% will have long-term, life-threatening or life-altering side effects, that less than 4% of national cancer funding goes to pediatric diseases, — if we really know all that and we still don’t show up. Well, . . . like I said, that’s sad.

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