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I’m still here . . . just have been ridiculously busy, mostly with school-related stuff.  Too many balls in the air right now, that’s for sure. But anyway, looking ahead to my busy winter season, I invite you all to start thinking about that other month in which childhood cancer is pushed to the forefront of the public conscience . . . March.

I will again be hosting a St. Baldrick’s head-shaving event for young people in our community on Sunday, March 10.  I welcome the participation of any and all of you and hope that those kids who shaved last year want to do so again and have inspired their friends and classmates to join them.  I’d been hoping to convince the counselor at Fairfax to adopt St Baldrick’s as our school’s charity for the year.  Unfortunately, I discovered that the entire district has committed yet again to the Pennies for Pasta fundraiser run by The Olive Garden.

Let me vent for a moment about this particular effort, promoted heavily to schools through the restaurant’s marketing team. The monies ultimately go to the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society, a worthy cause no doubt. But, despite some valiant searches through GuideStar and Charity Navigator, I can find no reports on exactly how much of the money goes there and how much stays with The Olive Garden. Maybe I’m being cynical and maybe they just hand all the donations over for the greater good, but the very name Pennies for Pasta bothers me. The idea is that students bring in their loose change (pennies) and the class who raises the most money wins a catered lunch by the restaurant (pasta). Of course, the prospect of sitting down with table clothes and real silverware in the classroom is exciting for kids and everyone likes a little motivation. But it also teaches kids that you only give when you get something in return.

One of the things I love about St Baldrick’s — and that I think proves meaningful to young and old alike — is that there are no prizes. Sure, you get a t-shirt and a button, but that’s not the same thing (and those serve to promote awareness not just of the organization but, more importantly, of childhood cancer).  Instead, the children who participate in these events learn that no matter how young they are, they have the power to make a true difference.  They can sacrifice in ways that (some of) the grown-ups around them are unwilling to do. That’s quite a powerful realization: I can change the world, I have impact. Not because I found some spare change in my couch cushions and won a prize, but because I gave something real, a piece of myself, and expected nothing in return.

Of course, the truth is that these kids get a lot in return and for good reason. They feel like they’re part of something important . . . because they are. They’re celebrated in their homes and schools and local media for their bravery . . . which they display in all its glory. They’re praised by their teachers and classmates and friends and families as heroes . . . because they are.  No noodles necessary.

 

Ah, fall, my favorite time of year.  It still feels like summer, of course (and still is summer, of course), but I do so love September. Fires in the backyard on cool weekend evenings, high school football games, and Childhood Cancer Awareness Month.

Yeah, it may not get the attention that October does, with pink ribbons exploding out of storefronts and tiny percentages of your lipstick purchase going to breast cancer research, but it is just as necessary and just as deserving of public notice.

I’m not going to drown you in all the stats (at least not today), but I will tell you what my family will be doing this month.

This afternoon, as soon as I pick up the boys from school (and show off my new haircut — pics to follow), we’ll drive out to Avon to give a talk at a golf event, raising funds for Rainbow Babies & Children’s. Tomorrow evening, we’ll tune in to the live televised Stand Up To Cancer fundraiser, an every-other-year favorite for us. I recently received an email that said that a photo I submitted of Austin might (key word, there: might) be used during the show. So tune in to ANY of the major networks on Friday and keep your eyes peeled.

I am also currently trying to get the Cleveland Heights University Heights schools to adopt St. Baldrick’s as their district-wide charity. I have pretty strong feelings about teaching kids the value of actual giving — as opposed to just bribing them with prizes and incentives, like the current Pasta for Pennies fundraiser does. But I’ll save that tirade for another day.

And on Saturday, September 29, our family will be walking — hopefully alongside many of YOU — in Northeast Ohio’s CureSearch Walk. Team Austin is still preeeeeeeeetty small, but I know a few people who could change that.

And if you ever wonder why this is all necessary, take a look at this image, posted recently on St Baldrick’s Facebook page, under the heading Why fight cancer?

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